BenchMark 2009 No. 2: News in Brief
BenchMark 2009 No. 2: News in Brief
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BenchMark 2009 No. 2: News in Brief
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Burns & McDonnell world headquarters building earns Energy Star label for using 35 percent less energy than similar buildings; Burns & McDonnell wins contract for Naval shipyard at Portsmouth, Virginia; Biomass facilities for Oglethorpe Power Cooperative planned in Georgia to provide carbon-neutral power for a 100-MW generation facility.

World Headquarters Building Receives Energy Star Label

The Burns & McDonnell world headquarters building in Kansas City, Mo., recently received an Energy Star label of 85 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The Energy Star label places the firm’s world headquarters among the top 15 percent of facilities nationwide for energy performance. Commercial buildings that have earned the Energy Star label use, on average, 35 percent less energy than typical similar buildings and generate one-third less carbon dioxide.

Burns & McDonnell Wins Contract for Naval Shipyard

The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Mid-Atlantic recently selected Burns & McDonnell to provide engineering and design services for the installation of a controlled industrial facility at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va. The $40 million facility will be built to support nuclear-powered aircraft carriers ported in Norfolk. Burns & McDonnell provides specialized expertise from planning through commissioning and operations to handle the project’s rigorous Naval controls and requirements for safety, security, coatings, containment, material handling and processes.

Biomass Generation Facilities Planned in Georgia

Burns & McDonnell is assisting Oglethorpe Power Cooperative in Tucker, Ga., with the initial development phases for two carbon-neutral, 100-MW electrical generating facilities to be fueled by a woody biomass mixture. The high-capacity intermediate power generation plants will be steam-electric generating stations using conventional fluidized bed boiler/steam turbine technology. The woody biomass fuel for the plants will include processed roundwood, primary manufacturing residue and harvest residue. The plants will be designed to allow for the co-firing of other types of biomass, such as pecan hulls and peanut shells. The alternatives report for the projects, to be sited in east central Georgia, was submitted to the Rural Utilities Service in February. Burns & McDonnell will provide technical support to Oglethorpe in the next phases, including the scoping meeting and preparation of an environmental impact statement. The Burns & McDonnell Atlanta office is providing permitting services.

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