BenchMark 2009 No. 4: Feature Projects
BenchMark 2009 No. 4: Feature Projects
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BenchMark 2009 No. 4: Feature Projects
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Solar Technology Acceleration Center in Aurora, Colorado, will support equipment testing; Charlotte Amalie Streetscape Design in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, will bring aesthetic solutions, wider pedestrian walkways and pavers, and sustainable features.

Building the Future of Solar Power

The Midwest Research Institute (MRI), along with five additional solar energy organizations, is leading the way to realizing solar energy’s impact with the Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC) under construction in Aurora, Colo. Burns & McDonnell is providing comprehensive planning, design and implementation strategies for the project. SolarTAC is the initial development of the larger Aurora Campus for Renewable Energy project. It is being constructed on a 78-acre, greenfield site on which installation and testing of photovoltaic and concentrated solar power systems will take place. The site requires flexibility for a variety of users while still using shared buildings and infrastructure to control costs. Facilities to support solar equipment testing at SolarTAC will include manufacturing and assembly buildings, exhibition and meeting space, and interties with Xcel Energy and required utilities. “The challenge has been anticipating future users, as well as the environmental requirements of this site, and positioning infrastructure to ensure adaptability for anyone who sets up testing facilities,” says Dennis Whitney, Burns & McDonnell project manager.

For more information, contact Dennis Whitney, 303-474-2223.

Change in the Midst of Business

A busy tourist shopping district is no place for frequent flooding. Nor is it the place to impede traffic flow with construction obstacles. The Virgin Islands Public Works Department must address these competing concerns in creating a new streetscape for a one-mile segment known as Main Street in Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas. The street typically floods with 2 inches of rain, pouring water into the high-end jewelry shops and alley malls that line the route. The 22- to 24-foot-wide asphalt concrete pavement, one-lane road with side parking has irregular 2- to 4-foot concrete sidewalks with limited curb and gutters. As a subconsultant to Jaredian Design Group, a local A/E firm, Burns & McDonnell is providing engineering design, preparation of plans and specifications, and cost estimates for stormwater improvements and traffic maintenance. Design is scheduled to be complete in 2010. “Preliminary plans include evaluating night construction to preserve day hours for business and sightseers,” says Ron Colas, manager of the Burns & McDonnell Miami office. “Aesthetic solutions will include local materials, wider pedestrian walkways and pavers, and sustainable features that maintain and enhance the Caribbean flavor of the island.”

For more information, contact Ron Colas, 305-476-5820.

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