BenchMark 2010 No. 2: News in Brief
BenchMark 2010 No. 2: News in Brief
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BenchMark 2010 No. 2: News in Brief
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Firm to design hospital central utility plant; Cogeneration facility to use blast furnace gas; Client survey results earn award from PSMJ Resources.

Firm to Design Hospital Central Utility Plant

Parkland Health & Hospital System selected Burns & McDonnell to perform an energy analysis and design the mission-critical central utility plant at its new Dallas location. Expected to be completed in late 2012, the plant will feature 12,000 tons of cooling, 110,000 pounds-per-hour of steam and 20 megawatts of emergency power. Energy-efficient measures to be evaluated include heat pump chillers, thermal energy storage, chilled water plant optimization and other energy-saving measures to optimize energy use and provide redundant, reliable and efficient utilities.

Cogeneration Facility to Use Blast Furnace Gas

Burns & McDonnell is completing front-end engineering design for a Middletown, Ohio, cogeneration project that will use blast furnace gas from AK Steel Corp.’s Ohio Works facility to produce steam and electric power. Air Products and Chemicals Inc. selected Burns & McDonnell as its engineer in February. Steam and power will be returned to AK Steel. The facility is planned for commercial operation in 2013.

Client Survey Results Earn Award from PSMJ Resources

Professional Services Management Journal (PSMJ) Resources Inc. has named Burns & McDonnell one of just six engineering firms in North America to receive its 2009 Premier Award for Client Satisfaction. Burns & McDonnell is the only winner in the top 100 engineering firms as ranked by Engineering News-Record magazine. The award is based on a survey of current clients rating Burns & McDonnell in the areas of helpfulness, responsiveness, quality, accuracy, meeting schedules, maintaining budgets, and staying within the scope and fees. Burns & McDonnell ranked highest in “Responsiveness to Client Needs,” with a score of 6.1 on a 7-point scale.

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